The End 2 End Challenge

Each year many locals and brave ex-pats take to streets of Bermuda to walk, run and bike from one end of the island to other all in the name of charity and the perfect excuse to come out and have fun with family and friends.  The island of Bermuda stretches just short of 22 miles, so of course one would think it wouldn’t be that long of journey to complete. While very few decided to go the long haul, I decided to stay within the majority and start my journey from the middle of island.

The course travels on the old railroad trail along the sea, where you soon discover beauty defiantly have an address here on the island!  Many local businesses are stationed throughout the route giving away food, small gifts and words of encouragement.  The locals were very supportive and the music in Somerset Parish, a community towards the end, took me back to the crate and record days in high school.  I really enjoy this event and discovered that a fourteen mile hike on a Saturday morning was not so bad.

House of Amouage

The pillowing clouds of fresh peppercorn laced with vanilla hits your senses upon entry into the “Amouage” perfumery, located in a suburban neighborhood just 20 minutes outside of Muscat, Oman. (amouage meaning “wave” in Arabic). I wanted to venture into this establishment just to get an inside look at how perfumes are created from natural resources. Also, I wanted to chat with the tour guide on Arab women’s love for special made fragrances. I learned that the Middle Eastern culture is known to have the most fragrance obsessed individuals in the world, so it may not be uncommon to find a place like this in your neighborhood.  The history of the factory’s first scent was interesting, as the sweet smells was created by burning old date leaves in the hot desert sun and were later carried to the villagers homes to linger throughout the day. How refreshing!!

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From the Ghetto to the Gold Coast

“16 Shots! 16 Shots ! 16 Shots!”  Finally a protest that will not be ignored!! I’ve been glued to my PC since viewing the horrific killing of Laquan McDonald. A young African-American shot to death 16 times which was captured on a police dash camera.  The video, albeit being shown a year later, has shaken up the city at large and  upset the masses.  When the advertisements began posting to my Facebook timeline about a “Blackout” on “Black Friday” needless to say, I got excited.  I’ve watched  the protests in Ferguson, Baltimore and New York.  I’ve read  the stories, I harbor sympathy for the victims and families all effected by the current situations happening in urban communities across the United States.  Usually when we decide to protest, we stayed within our confines allowing our voices to only be heard within the corner blocks in the neighborhood.  This time, we decided to ventured outside and took the fight Downtown,  on the Gold Coast and the Magnificent Mile, where this protest wouldn’t surely be forgotten.  Enough is enough as cliche as that may sound!  Shot a kid sixteen times?  No I didn’t know him,  but I have researched his background and he defiantly didn’t deserved to die that way.  The videos, interviews, pictures and conversations about the unfortunate event are priceless!  Hopefully one lost soul would become enlightened by these recent catastrophes will get help educated.  To those who are educated and may have forgotten about hard times were tough for us coming up, especially during the crack era must now WAKE UP!!  What happened to Laquan, can happen to anybody.

The Sinkhole

By taking a nice scenic drive along the desert mountains, just about an hour away from Al Seeb, you can journey off the Hawiyat Park to take a dip in Bimmah Sink Hole.  The park is just a few kilometers away from the Arabian Peninsula and is one of the most interesting tourist attractions in Oman.

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A great place to camp and cool off!
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The view from up top is breathtaking!
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I was even treated to fish nibbling pedicure.

As I venture out more, I’m starting to realize that Oman may have some

of the greenest cities in the Middle East.

Little Rock Arkansas: Retracing the steps of “The Little Rock Nine”

Nearly 5 years ago, I decided to explore my options, take a risk to travel across the globe to teach abroad in the Middle East.   At that time, the state of education had

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A collection of items donated from each of the students to the museum that was built to honor their legacy.
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These shoes belong to Elizabeth Eckford, a young  women who was brazen enough to withstand the anger, yelling and rage from segregationists when she made attempt to enter school.
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I had to capture this moment as I truly admire these unsung heroes of the Civil Rights Movement.
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A portrait created a art student from Little Rock High School.

it’s troubles but I learned to adapt and persevere to become a passionate Special Needs Educator. I took for granted the restorative natural of travel and how easy it is to explore the United States without a passport or visa.  That’s why every Summer I create an agenda and go on a road trip to visit places and/or states I’ve never seen.  This year, one of the many places I traveled to  was Little Rock, Arkansas. I had the liberty of walking the same route nine students took nearly 60 years ago to force their way into high school to get the educated.
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The Little Rock Nine were a group of nine African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. Their enrollment was followed by the Little Rock Crisis, in which the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated school by Orval Faubus, the Governor of Arkansas.